‘WandaVision’ Review: ‘Bewitched’ Meets ‘The Twilight Zone’ Meets the MCU

WandaVision Disney+WandaVision Disney+
‘WandaVision’ Disney+ | Marvel Studios 2020

Questions lurk as full explanations remain just out of reach. And, as for Elizabeth Olsen’s Wanda and Paul Bettany’s Vision, they get on quite swimmingly in the mid-1900s. As supporting characters utter phrases like “gee willikers” and “this is gonna be a gas,” Wanda and Vision must convince the townspeople that they are no different than anyone else.

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany will razz your berries with their old-school, sitcom-style acting 

1950s Wanda props her hands at hip level as she walks, always with a subtle hip swish to suggest a polished feminine demeanor. She almost always articulates as if asking a question, and she wonders if wearing pants will sit poorly with a crowd of women garbed in skirts. And, to do magic, why she snaps her fingers of course.

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WandaVision is a story set in suburbia with super-powered beings at the helm. It kicks off in a fashion reminiscent of Bewitched and I Dream of Jeannie — intentionally mimicking the grandeur of the bygone sitcom — before veering off into the twisty-turny. It’s reverence meets reinvention. Marvel pays homage to the classics while tinkering with their antiquated formula to pointedly mock the gender stereotypes and sexism that often characterized such shows.

As laugh tracks finish off each quippy remark, Wanda and Vision become the image of an idealistic life. Yet, the mysteries at the core remain everpresent — how could this be? What has resurrected Vision since Avengers: Endgame?

‘WandaVision’ Disney+ | Marvel Studios 2020

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Questions lurk as full explanations remain just out of reach. And, as for Elizabeth Olsen’s Wanda and Paul Bettany’s Vision, they get on quite swimmingly in the mid-1900s. As supporting characters utter phrases like “gee willikers” and “this is gonna be a gas,” Wanda and Vision must convince the townspeople that they are no different than anyone else.

Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany will razz your berries with their old-school, sitcom-style acting 

1950s Wanda props her hands at hip level as she walks, always with a subtle hip swish to suggest a polished feminine demeanor. She almost always articulates as if asking a question, and she wonders if wearing pants will sit poorly with a crowd of women garbed in skirts. And, to do magic, why she snaps her fingers of course.

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Elizabeth Olsen’s housewife version of Wanda is impeccable; each exaggerated facial expression rests upon her face for that extra second (or two) to ensure the audience catches it. And when her face contorts to indicate confusion, images of Lucille Ball come flooding in. Olsen delivers without over-selling it; she finds the sweet spot that exists between the character viewers know and the tone the show is aiming to strike. And, she meets her match in Paul Bettany. 

Vision, though yearning to please his boss at a company that seemingly does nothing, is not just the breadwinner in this tale. He will learn to change a diaper, and he will be there to raise his son, challenging the negative depictions tied to socialized masculinity that defined the mid-1900s. Yet, he’s just as comfortable as Olsen in sitcom land. And, he even gets to try his hand at

Source:: Showbiz Cheat Sheet

      

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