Magid: Apple, competitors building phones with impressive cameras

I haven’t had a chance to put the new iPhones to the test, but based on what I saw at the Apple announcement Tuesday, they are better than I expected. For one

Larry Magid

thing, Apple reduced the price of its entry-level new phone by $50, selling the iPhone 11 at $669 compared with the $749 it initially charged for the iPhone XR.

The iPhone 11 Pro, which fills the slot of last year’s iPhone XS, starts at $999 for the model with a 5.8-inch screen. The 6.5-inch 11 Pro Max starts at $1,099 with its larger 6.5-inch screen. The only other difference between the Pro and the Pro Max is a larger battery on the larger phone. Apple claims “Up to 18 hours video playback; up to 11 hours video streaming” on the smaller phone and “Up to 20 hours video playback; up to 12 hours video streaming” on the Max. The company said that it added four hours of battery life to the smaller model and five hours to the larger one. If so, that’s an impressive achievement. Of all the upgrades companies can add to phones, extra battery life is the one that’s most important to me. If I’m doing a lot with my phone, I rarely get through a full day without having to recharge.

Based on the demos I saw during the announcement, the most impressive aspects of the new phones – especially the iPhone 11 Pro – are the upgraded cameras.

There are two camera lenses on the back of the iPhone 11 and three on the 11 Pro. The 11 sports both a wide mode and ultra-wide mode lens, making it possible to add more to a scene without having to back away from the subject. The 11 also has “Portrait mode, Night mode, Auto Adjustments, next-generation Smart HDR, and 4K video up to 60 fps with extended dynamic range.”

The new phone has improved portrait mode, with enhanced lighting effects and – most important—the ability to take pictures in low-light, like what Google offers on its Pixel 3 (Google too will soon announce new phones). There’s also an easier way to switch from still to video. You can be aiming your camera at a subject for a still shot and hold down the shutter to quickly shoot video. Apple also added slow-motion to the front “selfie” camera, calling it “slofies” along with a wider

Source:: East Bay – Lifestyle

      

(Visited 5 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *