A yoga teacher explains the difference between Bikram, Vinyasa, Rocket, and Power yoga — and how to pick the right one for your goals

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High-intensity interval training (HIIT) continues to grow in popularity, but the high impact workout can often lead to stiffness and tight muscles.
It’s important to factor some restorative exercise into your routine.
Chris Magee, head of yoga at Another Space, talked us through some of the many variations of yoga and how to pick the right practice for you.
Vinyasa, Ashtanga, Hatha, Restorative, Rocket, Power, and Bikram yoga are just a few of the many variations.

High-intensity interval training (HIIT) continues to grow in popularity, but the high impact workout can often lead to stiffness and tight muscles, making it more important than ever to factor some restorative exercise into your routine.

Yoga is very versatile — but there are many different styles of practice that could confuse a beginner. To make it even more complicated, many studios and instructors teach their own signature styles.

To help us through the maze, Chris Magee, head of yoga at Another Space, talked us through a few of the many variations of yoga and and what they’re likely to mean on a timetable.

Magee, a former actor and ex-professional rugby player, found yoga as a way to heal his body from long-term sporting injuries — and he stresses the importance of mixing up your workout routine.

If you’re looking to strike a balance in your training regime, or are simply interested in taking up yoga, here are some of the most popular variations you may come across:

Vinyasa

“Vinyasa is the broadest term for flow yoga which is the most popular in the western world,” Magee told Business Insider.

The word Vinyasa applies to the principle of synchronising movement with breath. In a Vinyasa class everything is guided by your breath, including how long you hold a pose for, he said, and each posture flows into the next.

A teacher will instruct the class with things like: “Inhale bring your arms up into the air, exhale fall forward into your legs,” he said.

“It’s consciousness, breath, and movement. But it can be quite aerobic, it can be quite fast-paced, and you can still get your sweat on — I teach quite a strong vinyasa class.

“No two classes of mine will be the same. There will be similar elements and I may reintroduce things, but you won’t know what you’re getting,” he said, adding that it’s his favourite yoga to practice, because he enjoys the unknown.

Ashtanga

Ashtanga yoga is a variation of Vinyasa — it’s just with

Source:: Usa latest news – Culture

      

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