People sometimes unwillingly go into hypnotic trance states — here’s how you can learn to use them for good

trance hand

Most of us experience trance states to some extent.
These can range from zoning out when someone is yelling at you, to running on adrenaline when you have an accident.
Trance states are a form of dissociating, which can be beneficial.
But you don’t want to use it as a form of escape as a replacement to actually living your life.

Psychotherapist Jonathan Marshall tried some relaxing dissociation techniques with me during a video call recently. He told me to think think of myself floating to a place I found comforting. Over 15 minutes or so, he got me to believe my arm was weighed down by a bucket of water, and I couldn’t prise my hands away from each other.

Marshall bridges clinical psychology, coaching, and leadership with his clients, and he specialises in something called “trance states.” A common form of a trance state is when you’ve been driving along and suddenly you realise you’ve been paying no attention to the route you’ve taken.

“We call that highway hypnosis,” Marshall said. “Where you’re not aware that you just overtook three cars or three cars overtook you. Your mind is focused on whatever it may be focused on — the day’s work. But then if someone crossed the road and was in danger, your unconscious would fire to your conscious and say ‘come here now,’ and you would suddenly be focused in the here and now.”

Dissociating the right way is a delicate balance

We spend a lot of our time dissociated, according to Marshall. Our minds can take off in stressful situations, accidents, or sometimes for no real reason at all.

There are several different theories for why we do it, none of which are the favourite. But what is certain is that trance states can be beneficial.

“For example, you’re in an accident, and you’ve broken your collar bone,” he said. “You get out of the car, you help your child out of the car, and you feel fine. Half an hour later, you realise ‘oh my god I’ve broken my collar bone.’”

Apparently this happens with footballers a lot — they don’t realise they have a significant injury until they come off the pitch.

Dissociating from your body and dissociating from pain can be helpful if you need the adrenaline rush to help you get out of a dangerous situation, Marshall said. Like when someone small and relatively weak picks up a car after an accident to

Source:: Usa latest news – Culture

      

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