Movie review: ‘Marshall’ offers a novel narrative for historic biopic

Is Chadwick Boseman the new Meryl Streep? He’s certainly got her knack for channeling historical figures into impressive screen characters. He played a “good gawd!” James Brown in “Get on Up” and hit a solid home run as dignified Jackie Robinson in “42.”

Now in “Marshall,” about the 1940s legal career of young Thurgood Marshall, Boseman moves and amuses in tandem. In director Reginald Hudlin’s efficiently entertaining drama, the star polishes the crusading legal icon to a dazzling gleam.

Don’t confuse this with preachy, moralizing history. “Marshall” is not an eat-your-spinach civics lesson. It’s a fictional piece loosely based on fact. The script, by Michael Koskoff, a Connecticut civil rights attorney, and his screenwriter son Jacob Koskoff combines the kind of detail that law nerds will appreciate with solid, vivid character portraits.

The story offers a novel narrative for a great-man biopic, focusing on a forgotten footnote in his career. It turns a courthouse suspense drama into a social metaphor, blending a crime story, a mystery, a couple of mano a mano brawls and a dash of risqué action to spice things up. And on those alluring standards, it works nicely. I can’t say anything about the film’s authenticity, but it’s enjoyable.

The movie dramatizes Marshall’s early days as the NAACP’s top lawyer, representing black defendants in whatever jurisdictions require his sharp courtroom abilities. In this case, his focus is a 1941 court case in posh Greenwich, Connecticut, a rape trial that pitted a wealthy socialite and a black chauffeur against each other on the witness stand.

The driver, Joseph Spell (Sterling K. Brown, who won an Emmy as prosecutor Christopher Darden in “The People v. O.J. Simpson”), was accused by his boss’ wife, Eleanor Strubing (Kate Hudson), of rape and attempted murder. Spell, who had a less-than-spotless past, was arrested, and after a lengthy police interrogation, authorities said he had confessed. The story of the sensational criminal case spread, causing large numbers of black servants to be fired across the Northeast.

Marshall found the accounts to be contradictory and confusing. But the judge did not allow Marshall, an experienced criminal lawyer and brilliant tactician who lacked credentials to practice in Connecticut, to even speak in the courtroom.

The zealous Marshall arm-twisted a young Jewish insurance attorney, Samuel Friedman (master of comic relief Josh Gad), to step up in his place. Friedman examined witnesses and argued the case while Marshall called the plays from the side. Because

Source:: East Bay – Entertainment

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